Going Postal: Through rain and snow and wind and cold

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The weather this week reminded me of the unofficial US Postal mantra “Neither snow nor rain nor heat nor gloom of night stays these couriers from the swift completion of their appointed rounds.”

Actually, according to wikipedia this is a rephrasing of a quote from the ancient Greek Historian Herodotus.

Stayed neither by snow nor rain nor heat nor darkness from accomplishing my appointed course with all speed — HERODOTUS

Anyway, I was going riding this morning even if there was a hurricane or a blizzard. Instead it was wet and grey but fun once I got moving. Great road/trail route in the hills south-west of me.

11 rides so far in November isn’t bad considering the weather.

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Happiest while cycling uphill. More enthusiastic than talented, my 2014 Challenge is to cycle 50 great rides, slowly.

3 Comments

  1. Well, I’m impressed. Eleven rides in November! I am stuck now with the Tour de Basement, I believe, until 2008. And what is the “pomier” reference in your tags? There is an excellent drink from Normandy, a blend of calvados and cider, called pommier. Of course, there are about eighty restaurants in the world named “Le Pommier.” Toronto boasts a very fancy Auberge du Pommier: http://www.oliverbonacini.com/aubergemovie.html

  2. Hi Leslie,

    Oops, yes I shouldn’t use that Pomiers tag without an explanation.

    It’s actually a beautiful estate with the remains of a 12th century monastary, that is near me and part of the Chemin de St Jacques (el Camino) – with a beautiful set of trails that I bike on while watching out for Pilgrims.

    It is part of my standard one hour or less hilly, home mountain bike loop when I just want a quick ride.

    http://www.chartreuse-de-pomier.fr/htfr/0001.htm

    PS – i used to do business lunches occasionally at the Auberge de Pommiers as the Procter office is just up the road.

    See the link above, the history is quite interesting – Pomiers is not from pommes or apple but derives from the word “outside” I think as it is outside geneva.

    “Le mot pomier vient de pro murus soit en dehors des murs. C’est la raison pour laquelle l’orthographe correcte est Chartreuse de Pomier, non pas Chartreuse de Pommier du mot pommier arbre fruitier.”

    Photo of remaining very old Gatehouse:
    http://www.flickr.com/photos/willj/2042812285/

    Wife hiking the trails
    http://farm1.static.flickr.com/159/370942624_67ba2845e1.jpg?v=0

  3. Will,

    How are you? On a google of Chartruese de Pommier you site came up. Cool! Thank you and and Doreen once again for the hospitality. We all had a great time visiting you! The Alps are breathtaking! Next time I would love to join you on a cycle. Cheers!

    Bo

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